NFL agent Buddy Baker says his parents died from COVID-19 six minutes apart

Courtesy of Alyssa Baker(NEW YORK) -- On March 31, Baker announced that both of his parents, Stuart Baker, 74, and Adrian Baker, 72, died due to complications from the coronavirus. The couple had been married for 51 years, he said, and died just six minutes apart.

“My parents were two amazing individuals who impacted mine and many others' lives, and unfortunately [we] tragically lost them both within minutes of each other," Baker told ABC News. "There is an opportunity here for people to realize that [they] can have an impact by stopping the spread of the virus."

Baker took to Twitter to share the tragic news, and he urged everyone to take the pandemic and all CDC guidelines seriously.

“We live in a world of, ‘It can’t happen to me, it can’t happen to us, it can’t happen to my family.’ Well, it happened to us," he said in the Twitter post. "I’d like to take this time to make people start thinking about making a change.”

In an interview with ABC News, Baker detailed his parents' decline in hopes of helping others and stopping the spread of the virus.

Baker said his parents were in perfect health until three weeks ago when they visited their doctor, who told both of them that they may have a slight case of pneumonia but should be fine. When they continued to feel worse, his parents went to the hospital on March 19.

“My dad was admitted and my mom was sent home,” said Baker, who noted that his father had asthma while his mother, 72, didn’t have any pre-existing conditions.

With his father in the hospital, Baker worried about his mother, who was home alone, anxious and sad.

“My parents were married, as I tweeted, 51 years and [were] virtually inseparable. They were never in different places and they were rarely in different rooms,” said Baker. “So we were really worried about my mom being by herself … we would go see her and she was very weak and really wasn’t walking great.”

The family didn't want to upset her with negative news about his father's health. His dad had officially tested positive for COVID-19 and had been transferred to the ICU. About an hour or two later, as his mother showed more signs of deteriorating, he received a call from the hospital saying that his father "wasn't going to make it."

Baker knew the news would devastate his mother and he worried that, in her already weakened state, she would have an anxiety attack. So Baker said the family brought her to the hospital as a “precautionary measure."

About 45 minutes after his mother was admitted, Baker said he received a call from the hospital informing him that his mother’s condition was also grave.

“In the timeframe of about five to six hours, I was informed, on the phone, by two separate doctors, that each one of [my] parents were [most likely] not going to make it,” said Baker, who added he held onto optimism for his mother, who had yet to be treated.

"[My] mom on Wednesday woke up for a few minutes and kind of waved at us through the glass. We didn't go in the room and it just got worse every day," he said.

The next day, after both of his parents had been sedated, the doctor explained to the family that neither parent was going survive, Baker said. Both had organs shutting down.

The family filled out hospice paperwork that would take Baker’s parents off the ventilators so they would be comfortable and "let nature take its course," he said.

“Our request was that when they [took them off the ventilators], that would allow them to be in the same room,” said Baker. “[The hospital] put them in the same room and they actually sent up a picture of them holding hands [while sedated].”

On March 29, Baker's parents were taken off the ventilators and they passed away minutes apart, Baker said.

“When you go through this, a lot of things go through your head. You’re also not prepared,” he said.

“I started thinking, "This has got to stop. We’ve got to work to stop spreading this virus,'” said Baker. He said that people have to stop thinking, "I’m too young, I’m too healthy" and realize that "it could happen to somebody in your family.”

Baker hopes that others are moved by his family's "misfortune and tragedy, to hopefully make a difference.”

"There's nothing that can be done, unfortunately, to bring our parents back," Baker told ABC News. "But we can hopefully save other people's lives ... by doing things to stop the spread of this virus.”

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

NBA players cover lost wages of arena workers after coronavirus suspends season

:cmannphoto/iStock(NEW YORK) -- As health officials race to contain the spread of the coronavirus, NBA players from across the country are opening their wallets to assist stadium workers now forced to stay home.

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver announced on March 11 the league would suspend all games for at least 30 days, leaving arena employees without work.

Kevin Love, Giannis Antetokounmpo and Zion Williamson are just a few of the many players who have publicly pledged to donate thousands of dollars to workers after the unexpected hiatus.

"I'm concerned about the level of anxiety that everyone is feeling and that is why I'm committing $100,000," Love wrote on Instagram.

Love, a power forward for the Cleveland Cavaliers, was one of the first players to take action after the shocking suspension of the league. He mentioned that he was hopeful others would unite in supporting their communities.

"Be kind to one another," Love wrote. "I encourage everyone to take care of themselves and to reach out to others in need."

A chain reaction began and other players from teams across the country joined in.

"It's bigger than basketball," Antetokounmpo, a forward for the Milwaukee Bucks and reigning NBA MVP, wrote on Twitter, noting his plans to donate $100,000 dollars to the staff at the Fiserv Forum arena.

The list goes on.

Zion Williamson, a forward for the New Orleans Pelicans and the No. 1 draft pick in 2019, said his donation was a way to express his support and appreciation for those who have helped him since he began his career in the city.

"My mother has always set an example for me about being respectful for others and being grateful for what we have," Williamson wrote on Instagram. "So today I am pledging to cover the salaries for all of those Smoothie King Center workers for the next 30 days."

Even the Utah Jazz's Rudy Gobert, who became the first NBA player to test positive for the coronavirus, is donating $500,000 to part-time workers at the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City, with a portion of the money also going to families impacted by the disease.

"I know there are countless ways that people have been impacted," Gobert said. "These donations are a small token that reflect my appreciation and support for all those impacted and are the first of many steps I will take to try and make a positive difference, while continuing to learn more about COVID-19 and educate others."

At least seven NBA players have tested positive for coronavirus, including Gobert, Jazz teammate Donovan Mitchell, Detroit Pistons center Christian Wood and four members of the Brooklyn Nets. The team did not name who was diagnosed, but star Kevin Durant told The Athletic he was one of them.

Numerous teams, such as the Dallas Mavericks, Philadelphia 76ers and Golden State Warriors, have also stepped up to help the arena staff in their cities. Mavericks owner Mark Cuban was one of the first to say he would be helping out workers at the team's arena.

The donations will have a tremendous effect on many employees who are uncertain of their future in the face of COVID-19.

For Crystal Howell, who works in the ticketing office at Milwaukee's Fiserv Forum arena, it has meant the world.

"I'm in a two-income family, but due to what's going on in the world, we're both out of work," Howell said. "What Giannis and all the players have done really means a lot. They didn't have to do it and it's going to help me and my family."
Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Coronavirus and sports: Boston Marathon, The Masters postponed over safety concerns

cmannphoto/iStock (NEW YORK) -- As more people across the United States test positive for the novel novel coronavirus, the health emergency is forcing changes to major sporting events.

"NASCAR has decided to postpone the race events at Atlanta Motor Speedway this weekend and Homestead-Miami Speedway next weekend," the racing association announced Friday. "We believe this decision is in the best interest of the safety and well-being of our fans, competitors, officials and everyone associated with our sport. We will continue to monitor this dynamic situation as we assess future race events."

Boston Marathon postponed until September

The 2020 Boston Marathon, which was initially scheduled for April 20, has been postponed until Sept. 14, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh announced Friday.

2020 Masters Tournament postponed


Players in the hunt for the coveted green jacket will have to wait a little longer before they can drive up Magnolia Lane and on to the pristine greens of Augusta National this year.

Fred Ridley, chairman of Augusta National Golf Club, released a statement Friday that "under these unique circumstances" with the coronavirus outbreak "we have decided at this time to postpone the Masters Tournament, the Augusta National Women’s Amateur and the Drive, Chip and Putt National Finals."

"Ultimately, the health and well-being of everyone associated with these events and the citizens of the Augusta community led us to this decision. We hope this postponement puts us in the best position to safely host the Masters Tournament and our amateur events at some later date," Ridley continued.

Augusta National will continue to work with the World Health Organization, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, state and local health officials and local authorities.

The golf club's decisions come on the heels of an announcement from the PGA to cancel all scheduled Tour events through the first weekend of April.

NBA suspended for at least 30 days


Following the announcement Wednesday that the NBA would suspend its season indefinitely, the league's commissioner, Adam Silver, said in a letter Thursday that the "hiatus will last at least 30 days and we intend to resume the season, if and when it becomes safe for all concerned."

The league made the announcement after Utah Jazz player Rudy Gobert was reported to be infected with novel coronavirus. The Utah Jazz-Oklahoma City Thunder game was suspended midway through the contest, though Gobert never traveled to the arena.

"The NBA is suspending game play following the conclusion of tonight’s schedule of games until further notice," the league said in a statement. "The NBA will use this hiatus to determine next steps for moving forward in regard to the coronavirus pandemic."

Earlier Wednesday, in San Francisco, the mayor banned all group events over 1,000 people to slow the spread of the virus.

The Golden State Warriors had announced -- prior to the league's suspension -- that its Thursday night game in San Francisco against the Brooklyn Nets would be played without fans.

"It’s a shock for sure," Warriors star Steph Curry said Wednesday.

PGA Tour cancels The Players Championship, events through April

"It is with regret that we are announcing the cancellation of THE PLAYERS Championship. We have also decided to cancel all PGA TOUR events across all of our Tours in the coming weeks, through the Valero Texas Open," the Tour announced late Thursday.

The decision came hours after PGA Tour Commissioner Jay Monahan said at a press conference that tour events would proceed as scheduled, but without fans.

The Players Championship was set to begin Friday at TPC Sawgrass and Tour events will be impacted through April 5.

Monahan assured fans Thursday after the initial decision that the PGA Tour is "committed to providing refunds" for patrons who had tickets for this weekend's tournament in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida.

In the wake of the new travel advisories that President Trump announced Wednesday, Monahan said the Corales Puntacana Resort & Club Championship will be postponed due to potential logistical issues for players and staff who travel internationally, which could limit the Tour's "ability to successfully stage the event."

The PGA Tour said it has a protocol in place with its volunteer force and local health officials if a player or individual requests to be tested. Tour personnel can "make that happen and make certain there are resources in place for that situation if it were to intensify," he said.

While he did not reveal any specific protocols or decisions surrounding The Masters, Monahan said that he has "been in frequent discussion with Augusta [National Golf Club] and will leave it to Augusta to share their thinking."

The Tour has had a team in place "carefully monitoring and assessing the situation and its implications for several weeks," Monahan said of the coronavirus pandemic, and has weighed all the options in collaboration with Tour partners and members.

NCAA cancels March Madness tournaments

NCAA President Mark Emmert announced that the Division I men's and women's basketball tournaments and all remaining NCAA winter and spring championships have been canceled.

"This decision is based on the evolving COVID-19 public health threat, our ability to ensure the events do not contribute to spread of the pandemic, and the impracticality of hosting such events at any time during this academic year given ongoing decisions by other entities," the NCAA said in a statement.

The move came shortly after the Athletic Coast Conference suspended all games, practices and other activities in NCAA championships.

"This is uncharted territory and the health and safety of our student-athletes and institutions remains our top priority. This decision is aimed to protect from the further spread of COVID-19, ” ACC Commissioner John Swofford said in a statement.

MLB delays opening day, suspends spring training

MLB said on Thursday it would suspend spring training games and delay the start of the regular season by two weeks due to the coronavirus pandemic.

"This action is being taken in the interests of the safety and well-being of our players, clubs and our millions of loyal fans," the league said in a statement.

The league said it is preparing contingency plans for the 2020 schedule and announce updates as they become available.

"Nothing is more important to us than the health and safety of our players, employees and fans. MLB will continue to undertake the precautions and best practices recommended by public health experts," the league said in a statement.

Additionally, the World Baseball Classic qualifying games in Tucson, Arizona, were postponed.

Arsenal FC coach tests positive

Mikel Arteta, the head coach of Arsenal Football Club in England's Premier League, has tested positive for coronavirus and personnel who had direct contact with him -- including the team members -- have gone into self-isolation, the team announced.

The affected Arsenal staff include the full first-team squad, the coaching staff and "a smaller number of people from our Hale End" training center, the team said in a statement.

"This is really disappointing but I took the test after feeling poorly. I will be at work as soon as I’m allowed,” Arteta said in a statement.

Staff members who didn't have close contact with the coach will return to work in the next couple of days, and all training facilities will be closed to undergo deep cleaning, according to the team.

Arsenal officials warned that upcoming games may have to be postponed, but they would provide fans with updates as they get them.

NFL cancels annual meeting

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell told teams that he would cancel the league's annual meeting that was scheduled from March 29 to April 1.

"There will be full consideration and votes on any open football issues, including playing rules, bylaws, and resolutions, as well as other business matters, that were on the agenda for the Annual Meeting, at the Spring meeting scheduled for May 19-20," the NFL said in a statement.

Rudy Gobert apologizes for mocking outbreak

Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert made his first public statement since it was revealed he had contracted the coronavirus in a conciliatory post on Instagram.

Gobert jokingly touched all of the press microphones during a news conference Monday, mocking the outbreak after the NBA put new restrictions on media coverage in locker rooms. The 27-year-old player apologized in the post.

"At the time, I had no idea I was even infected. I was careless and make no excuse," he said.

Gobert said he is in great care and will recover. He advised others to take the outbreak seriously and be cautious.

"I will do whatever I can to support using my experience as [a] way to educate others and prevent the spread of this virus," he said.

Second Utah Jazz player tests positive

Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell announced he tested positive for the coronavirus in an Instagram post.

"I am going to keep following the advice of our medical staff and hope that we can all come together and be there for each other and our neighbors who need our help," he said.

Mitchell's teammate, Rudy Gobert, tested positive on Wednesday, which prompted the league to suspend the season.

Mitchell thanked fans for his support and wished everyone to stay safe as the outbreak continues.

NHL suspends season due to shared facilities with multiple NBA facilities

"In light of ongoing developments resulting from the coronavirus, and after consulting with medical experts and convening a conference call of the Board of Governors, the National Hockey League is announcing today that it will pause the 2019-20 season beginning with tonight’s games," NHL commissioner Gary Bettman said in a statement Thursday.

He went on, "It now seems likely that some member of the NHL community would test positive at some point" and therefore "it is no longer appropriate to try to continue to play games at this time."

"We will continue to monitor all the appropriate medical advice, and we will encourage our players and other members of the NHL community to take all reasonable precautions – including by self-quarantine, where appropriate," Bettman said. "Our goal is to resume play as soon as it is appropriate and prudent, so that we will be able to complete the season and award the Stanley Cup. Until then, we thank NHL fans for your patience and hope you stay healthy."

PGA Tour proceeds without fans through April

PGA Tour Commissioner Jay Monahan announced at a press conference on Thursday that "PGA Tour events across all tours will currently proceed as scheduled, but will do so without fans."

The policy will go into effect for The Players Championship that begins Friday and will continue through the Valero Texas Open in San Antonio, which begins March 30 and ends on April 5.

"We feel that this is a safe environment in which to continue to move forward with the tournament with 144 players and limited personnel on site," Monahan said of the 400-acre venue at TPC Sawgrass. "We’re comfortable that this is the right path forward, but this is something that we’ll continue to monitor as we go forward."

Monahan assured fans that the PGA Tour is "committed to providing refunds" for patrons who had tickets for this weekend's tournament in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida.

The PGA Tour said it has a protocol in place with its volunteer force and local health officials if a player or individual requests to be tested. Tour personnel can "make that happen and make certain there are resources in place for that situation if it were to intensify," he said.

In the wake of the new travel advisories that President Donald Trump announced Wednesday, Monahan said the Corales Puntacana Resort & Club Championship will be postponed due to potential logistical issues for players and staff who travel internationally, which could limit the Tour's "ability to successfully stage the event."

While he did not reveal any specific protocols or decisions surrounding The Masters, Monahan said that he has "been in frequent discussion with Agusta [National Golf Club] and will leave it to Augusta to share their thinking."

The Tour has had a team in place "carefully monitoring and assessing the situation and its implications for several weeks," Monahan said of the coronavirus pandemic, and has weighed all the options in collaboration with Tour partners and members.

Major League Soccer suspends season for 30 days

"Our clubs were united today in the decision to temporarily suspend our season -- based on the advice and guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), and other public health authorities, and in the best interest of our fans, players, officials and employees," MLS Commissioner Don Garber announced on Thursday.

NBA suspends season

The NBA announced it will suspend its season indefinitely following Wednesday's game.

The announcement came after a player with the Utah Jazz, identified as Rudy Gobert by ESPN's senior NBA reporter Adrian Wojnarowski, was diagnosed with novel coronavirus. The Utah Jazz-Oklahoma City Thunder game was suspended midway through the contest, though Gobert never traveled to the arena.

"The NBA is suspending game play following the conclusion of tonight’s schedule of games until further notice," the league said in a statement. "The NBA will use this hiatus to determine next steps for moving forward in regard to the coronavirus pandemic."

The news came after the league considered playing games in empty arenas.

Earlier Wednesday, in San Francisco, the mayor banned all group events over 1,000 people to slow the spread of the virus.

The Golden State Warriors had announced -- prior to the league's suspension -- that its Thursday night game in San Francisco against the Brooklyn Nets would be played without fans.

"It’s a shock for sure," Warriors star Steph Curry said Wednesday.

"Everything about our routines is reliant upon that kind of game day energy. Pulling up to the arena, seeing fans outside of Chase [Center] walking around in all the Warrior jerseys, even energy in the building, you can feel it all the way through the locker room, through the tunnel," Curry said. "The only thing is try to have a conversation about how you raise your level of intensity from the jump because you don't have that actual adrenaline rush of playing in front of 18,000 people like that."

"I know once the game starts it will be fairly easy to get into that type of flow," he added.

All other games and events at San Francisco's Chase Center, the home to the Warriors, through March 21 were canceled or postponed, officials added.

NBA players told to self-quarantine

For now, the Utah Jazz will be under quarantine in Oklahoma City. Thunder players were not tested and sent home, according to ESPN.

Some players who faced off on the court against the Jazz in recent days -- including the Toronto Raptors, Detroit Pistons, Boston Celtics, New York Knicks and Cleveland Cavaliers -- have been told to self-quarantine, ESPN said.

League sources told ESPN that some players and coaches from those teams scrambled to get tested for the virus as early as Wednesday night after learning of Gobert's diagnosis.

In addition to the team's recent opponents, there have been more than a dozen referees who have worked Jazz games over the past week that went on to officiate other league games. By late Wednesday night, players who'd come in contact with the Jazz were seeking tests for the virus, ESPN said.

Ivy League cancels springs athletics

The Ivy League on Wednesday canceled all games and practices through the rest of this academic year.

"In accordance with the guidance of public health and medical professionals, several Ivy League institutions have announced that students will not return to campus after spring break, and classes will be held virtually during the semester," the council of presidents said in a statement. "Given this situation, it is not feasible for practice and competition to continue."

Each school will determine if winter teams and athletes who qualified for postseason play will participate, the council said.

The league also announced it was canceling its men's and women's basketball tournaments and that the regular season champions had been planned to advance to the NCAA tournament.

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Brother of Chicago Bears legend among 10 charged in illegal gambling scheme

Sezeryadigar/iStock(CHICAGO) -- Casey Urlacher, the brother of Pro Football Hall of Fame linebacker Brian Urlacher, was among those charged this week in an illegal offshore gambling scheme.

Urlacher and eight others helped supposed ringleader Vincent Delgiudice -- also known as "Uncle Mick" -- take sports bets and placed them in an illegal sports book based in Costa Rica, prosecutors alleged in a 28 page indictment unsealed in the Northern District of Illinois.

"It was further part of the conspiracy that Vincent Delgiudice used Federal Express to cause the cashier's checks and money orders to be delivered to the addresses in Costa Rica supplied by Individuals 1 and 2," the indictment says. "And others who worked for or were associated with Company A."

Urlacher is also the Mayor of Mettawa, Illinois and prosecutors alleged that he also made bets with Delgiduice, who prosecutors say accepted wagers from as many as 1,000 gamblers.

According to the Justice Department, a "law enforcement search of Delgiudice’s residence in Orland Park seized more than $1.06 million in cash; silver bars and jewelry valued at $347,895; and gold coins valued at $92,623."

DOJ added, "The indictment seeks forfeiture of these items, as well as Delgiudice’s residence. It also seeks a personal money judgment against Delgiudice of $8 million."

Bettors, including Urlacher, would send or meet with Delgiudice and pay him in cashier’s checks, before creating a website to further illegally bet on sports games -- the website was called "unclemick.com."

One of Deligudice’s co-conspirators, Matthew Knight, once texted a message to Gambler A, which said "Morning Bronco, going through figs, can you please tell Bronco 33 to pay or play, hasn’t played since February down 938."

In another instance Deliguidice told another co-conspirator "Todd Blaken by phone that he had 1,006 "customers" and had won $100,000, or "about $100 per player."

A lawyer for Urlacher has not returned ABC News' request for comment

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62-year-old man breaks world record with 8-hour plank

fizkes/iStock(CHICAGO) -- An Illinois man who spent the past several months training seven hours a day, including 1,500 sit-ups daily, has broken the male world record for longest time in the plank position.

George Hood, 62, of Naperville, Illinois, held a plank for eight hours, 15 minutes and 15 seconds, according to Guinness World Records, which certified Hood's record.

Hood -- a retired law enforcement officer who now works as a personal trainer -- set his first world record for the plank in 2011, holding it for one hour and 20 minutes. He most recently lost the title in 2016 and said his children inspired him to try to win it again.

"I'm the father of three sons and part of me did this for them," said Hood, whose adult sons have followed their dad into law enforcement careers.

Hood was also inspired to compete for the plank title again to raise mental health awareness. He completed the challenge on Feb. 15 at an Illinois gym, 515 Fitness, that focuses on using exercise to help treat mental health.

"I’m not a paid athlete," he said. "I do this thing because I can and I can also help raise awareness."

"I’ve seen enough folks in the military and my law enforcement comrades who haven’t fared so well," Hood said. "We want to break that stigma of seeking [mental health] help."

Hood deployed his own mental toughness to survive in a plank position for the length of a typical workday for most people. He listed to rock music to pass the time and focused on picturing himself as a rock solid tree.

"I often envision myself as a tree when I’m on that platform because all the energy I exude from that platform comes from earth," he said. "Like a tree I have roots and those roots go deep and when they do I’m ready to weather any storm that comes across my platform. I’m ready to stay in my pose without wavering."

Niki Perry, the founder of 515 Fitness, was by Hood's side for much of the eight hours and also worked with him during his training to prepare him mentally.

"We focused on mental toughness and the four c’s that you have to be able to get through to get through something as arduous as this: Commitment, consistency, core beliefs and evaluating challenges," she said, adding that the gym also arranged for members to speak out on their "why's" in life to provide inspiration to Hood.

At the end of the eight hours, Hood celebrated his new world title by doing 75 push-ups.

He said he thinks this plank world record title will be his last. Hood is now eyeing new challenges, like the winning the Guinness World Record for most push-ups completed in one hour, which currently stands at 2,806.

His advice for other people looking to hold even just a 20-second plank or do one push-up is to just get started.

"Everybody has a starting point," Hood said. "Everybody starts somewhere and then, like anything in life, you build from that."

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

2 former Ohio State football players indicted for rape, kidnapping

Franklin County Ohio Sheriff(COLUMBUS, Ohio) -- Two former Ohio State University football players accused of kidnapping and raping a woman were indicted on Friday.

Amir Riep, 21, Jahsen Wint, 21, are each facing two counts of rape and one count of kidnapping, Franklin County Prosecutor Ron O'Brien announced.

The charges stem from an alleged Feb. 4 incident involving a 19-year-old woman, according to police.

The woman is said to have visited the apartment of Riep and Wint to watch a movie. However, at some point in the night, she was allegedly restrained and forced to have non-consenual vaginal and oral sex with them, according to the prosecutors.

The two men turned themselves in last week and were being held at Franklin County Jail without bond. It's not yet clear if either has obtained legal representation.

If convicted, each faces a maximum prison term of 33 years and would have to register as a sex offender.

Buckeyes head coach Ryan Day said in a previous statement he had dismissed Riep and Wint from the team.

"I am not making any statement on the criminal charges, but it is clear they did not live up to our standards and my expectations," he said.

Riep was a cornerback and Wint played safety.

Their arraignment is scheduled for March 6.

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Cleveland Cavaliers trade for center Andre Drummond

Patrick Smith/Getty Images(CLEVELAND) -- The Cleveland Cavaliers are finalizing a deal with the Detroit Pistons for Andre Drummond, the NBA's leading rebounder. The Cavaliers are sending the Pistons center John Henson, guard Brandon Knight, and a second-round pick in the 2023 NBA Draft, according to ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski.

Drummond remains under contract through next season, after which he will become an unrestricted free agent.

The move comes as a surprise, given that the Cavs currently sport a 13-39 record and sit in last place in the Eastern Conference.

Drummond was also taken aback by the move. The center took to Twitter, voicing his displeasure with the way the trade was handled.

"If there's one thing I learned about the NBA, there's no friends or loyalty," Drummond wrote. "I've given my heart and soul to the Pistons, and to have this happen with no heads up makes me realize even more that this is just a business!"

 

 

 

Drummond has played for Detroit since he was 19 years old. He helped lead the Pistons to two playoff appearances during that time, although the Pistons were swept both times.

Drummond, a two time All Star, is averaging a career-high with 17.8 points per game and leads the league with his 15.8 rebounds per game.

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Meet Sofia Kenin, the American who beat Gauff, Barty and more to reach Australian Open final

Chaz Niell/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Sofia Kenin was not the American most tennis fans expected to make it to this year's Australian Open final.

Yet it will be the 21-year-old -- and not other American favorites like Serena Williams and Coco Gauff -- playing in Saturday's final.

"I'm not shocked," Kenin said after her semifinal win Thursday. "It's a dream come true for me. I've always dreamed about this. Of course, I believed in myself."

Kenin made it to the final after a 7-5, 7-6 win against Ashleigh Barty, the reigning French Open champion and world No. 1 who was vying to become the first Australian to win the Australian Open singles title in more than four decades.

"I was playing, I knew I was in the semifinal. It was just great. I'm so happy I was able to share the court with Ash," Kenin said. "Yeah, after the match, of course it's pretty emotional. It's the finals. It's something different, it's surreal. [I'm] so grateful for it."

Kenin beat Gauff, the 15-year-old American phenom, in three sets in the fourth round, after defeating Ons Jabeur of Tunisia in the third round and another American player, Ann Li, in the second round.

She will face Spain's Garbiñe Muguruza in Saturday's women's singles final.

Kenin, seeded No. 14 going into Australia, has won three singles titles in her career.

She was born in Moscow, Russia, and moved to the U.S. as an infant. Her family settled in Pembroke Pines, Florida, where Kenin was homeschooled, according to her Women's Tennis Association (WTA) bio.

Kenin's father, Alexander, who remains her coach to this day, started teaching her tennis at age 5, and she was on a magazine cover by age 6, according to ESPN.

Kenin shared a video on Instagram last year of her being interviewed at age 7 about her ability to take on Andy Roddick.

Fourteen years later, Kenin is playing for the chance to win her first Grand Slam title.

The last American female to win the Australian Open single's title was Williams in 2017.

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Fiancee of late Aaron Hernandez speaks out on his sexuality after docuseries

ABC(NEW YORK ) -- The fiancee of the late Aaron Hernandez is speaking out for the first time since the release of a new Netflix docuseries on the life of the football star turned convicted killer, including rumors about his sexuality.

In a sit-down interview with ABC News' Amy Robach that aired Wednesday on Good Morning America, Shayanna Jenkins-Hernandez said that while Hernandez did not express to her in any way he may have been gay or bisexual, if he did, she "would not have loved him any differently."

Hernandez, a former New England Patriots tight end, was found guilty of murder in April 2015 for the killing of Odin Lloyd, the 27-year-old fiance of Jenkins-Hernandez' sister, who was found shot to death in a suburb of Boston about two years earlier. After Hernandez's trial, and prior to his suicide in his prison cell in 2017, his alleged relationships with men became a topic of discussion.

"You can't describe someone's sexuality without them being here," Jenkins-Hernandez told ABC News. "Although I have a child with Aaron, I still can't tell you how he was feeling inside. No one can."

The Netflix docuseries Killer Inside: The Mind of Aaron Hernandez, which was released in January, spoke to a high school teammate and friend of Hernandez, Dennis Sansoucie, who said the two engaged in a sexual relationship while in high school.

Jenkins-Hernandez said that she knew of Sansoucie, but doesn't know him well and he wasn't very involved in Hernandez's adult life.

However, she said through tears, "You start to feel for people that may be hiding inside how they really feel. And I -- I feel awful for that."

Jenkins-Hernandez, who was engaged to Hernandez at the time of his suicide and shares a daughter with him, said he was "certainly a man to me. There was no behavior that made me think differently."

She wishes that if Hernandez had been hiding his sexuality, he would have come to her.

"If he did feel that way or if he felt the urge, I wish that I -- I was told," said Jenkins-Hernandez. "And I wish that he -- you know, he would've told me 'cause I wouldn't -- I would not have loved him any differently. I would have understood. It's not shameful and I don't think anybody should be ashamed of who they are inside, regardless of who they love. I think it's a beautiful thing, I just wish I was able to tell him that."

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San Francisco Giants hire 1st female coach in MLB history

33ft/iStock(SAN FRANCISCO) -- The San Francisco Giants announced that Alyssa Nakken will be an assistant on the coaching staff, officially making her the first female coach in Major League Baseball history.

Nakken, a four-time Academic All American softball player for Sacramento State, joined the Giants in 2014 as an intern and worked on a variety of projects, according to a Giants press release.

Last month, she was nominated by her peers and co-awarded the 2019 Sprinkles of Love Award, a Giants honor, for her ethics, professionalism and humanitarianism.

Referring to Nakken and Mark Hallberg, who was also added to the coaching staff as an assistant, Giants manager Gabe Kapler said in a statement, "Alyssa and Mark are highly respected members of the organization and I'm delighted that they will now focus their talents on helping to build a winning culture in the clubhouse."

The team now has a total of 13 coaches.

Before her promotion, Nakken was responsible for leading a number of the team's health and wellness events, including the Giant Race Series. She currently chairs the Giants' first Employee Resource Group, aimed at creating a company culture that encourages diversity and equity.

"In every organization, environment affects performance, and baseball clubhouses are no different. That's why in addition to assisting the rest of the coaching staff on the field, Mark and Alyssa will focus on fostering a clubhouse culture that promotes high performance through, among other attributes, a deep sense of collaboration and team," said Kapler.

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